Genesis

“Parsha and Purpose” – Shemot 5780

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“Parsha and Purpose” – Parshat Shemot 5780

“Living the Ideals of Chesed and Social Justice – A Necessary Requirement for Leaders”

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Parshat Shemot: Living the Ideals of Chesed and Social Justice – A Necessary Requirement for Leaders

Rav Chaim of Brisk (1853-1918) revolutionized the study of Talmud through his novel “Brisker” approach, and added new dimensions to our ability to understand that magnum opus of Jewish scholarship.  Talmud studies in any midrasha or yeshiva are greatly impacted by Rav Chaim’s textual analysis.

Rav Chaim lived in the Lithuanian town of Brisk and served as rabbi of the town, but was buried in Warsaw (that in itself is a story, but we won’t elaborate on it now). Rav Chaim requested that on his tombstone (not the one that marks his grave today, which was replaced after the original was destroyed by the Nazis) only the words “Av Beit Din d’Brisk” – Rabbi of Brisk – and “Ish Hesed” – a man of lovingkindness – be inscribed.

Rav Chaim did not want anything written about the books he composed, or the unbelievable advances in the study of Talmud be written.  He felt that the most important job he had as a Rav was not delivering amazing sermons or coming up with incomparable chiddushei Torah, but rather to be a “Rav Chesed” – a man who performed acts of lovingkindness.

In the middle of his tenure as a rabbi, almost all of Brisk was destroyed in a fire. While the homes of the wealthy were soon rebuilt, those of the poor were not; Rav Chaim went and slept on the front yards of those homes, until they were rebuilt.

When there were babies that were born out of wedlock, the parents knew that they could be placed in the home of Rav Chaim, this great Torah scholar, and he would make sure that the mamzerim and mamzerot of the Jewish people would be taken care of.

When he was given a shed full of wood to heat his home, his condition was that there was to be no lock on that shed, so that the poor could also use the wood as needed.

That was Rav Chaim.

Nechama Leibowitz so correctly tells us that before you are introduced to the quintessential leader of the Jewish people, before he can stand on the stage of leadership, we have to be introduced to his CV, those acts and traits which make him truly unique.

What makes Moshe unique is that he is a man of chessed. When he sees something that is wrong, whether it is social injustice between a master and a slave, social injustice between two oppressed people, or social injustice between two strangers, Moshe needs to get involved.

That is what makes Moshe a leader. This is the quality of genuine leadership.

And subsequently, when Moshe sees the burning bush, he says, “Asura Na, v’er’eh,” I’m going to go over and look, “madua lo yiv’ar ha’sneh?”- Why isn’t the bush being consumed by the fire?

That was Moshe’s greatness. When something was not right, out of character; when someone was being oppressed, Moshe expressed concern.

This is the message that Rav Chaim of Brisk highlights to us. When he is buried, he requests that his matzeva, his tombstone, not focus on his scholarly Torah contributions, but rather on his contributions in the realm of chessed.

Parshat Shemot reminds us that if we want to be redeemers in our lives – like Rav Chaim of Brisk, like Moshe Rabbeinu – we have to speak truth to power, not only through the study of Torah, but by taking those values and implementing them every day of our lives.

Shabbat Shalom.

“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Shemot 5780

This week’s parsha has been sponsored in memory of Florence Bryskin (Tzipporah bas Mayer Yitzchak and Henya) on the occasion of her Yahrzeit on the 22 of Teves Shabbat Shalom: Parshat Shemot (Exodus 1:1 – 6:1) By Rabbi Shlomo Riskin Efrat, Israel – “But the midwives feared God and they did not do as the …

Read more“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Shemot 5780

“Parsha and Purpose” – Vayechi 5780

“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Vayechi 5780

This week’s commentary has been dedicatedin honor of Karen Aron, a remarkable Aishet Chayil and Imma, by her husband, Mike Shabbat Shalom: Parshat Vayechi (Genesis 47:28 — 50:26 )             By Rabbi Shlomo Riskin Efrat, Israel -In a most uplifting and inspiring deathbed scene, grandfather Jacob/Israel peacefully takes leave of this world …

Read more“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Vayechi 5780

“Parsha and Purpose” – Vayigash 5780

“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Vayigash 5780

Shabbat Shalom: Parshat Vayigash (Genesis 44:18 — 47:27)             By Rabbi Shlomo Riskin Efrat, Israel — “And Joseph went up to greet Israel his father; he fell on his neck and he wept on his neck exceedingly” (Gen. 46:29) In these few words, our Torah describes a dramatic meeting between an aged …

Read more“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Vayigash 5780

“Parsha and Purpose” – Miketz 5780

“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Miketz 5780

Shabbat Shalom: Parshat Miketz (Genesis 41:1 – 44:17)             By Rabbi Shlomo Riskin Efrat, Israel – “Yosef was served by himself and the brothers by themselves… the brothers were seated before Joseph (with Yehuda at head of table)… they drank with him and became intoxicated.” (Gen 43:32) “And Joseph’s brothers came …

Read more“Shabbat Shalom” – Parshat Miketz 5780

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